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Book Review: Countdown to Lockdown by Mick Foley

Posted: 23 Apr 2018 01:30 AM PDT

When I got back into wrestling as a student Mick Foley quickly became one of my favourites. He had some ridiculously brutal matches while coming across as a likeable, rather sweet dude. There was something about him that won you over and he seemed more real than many of the characters he grappled with.

I read his autobiography which just made me like him even more as it was well written and very entertaining.

He’s since written more books and this, a fourth memoir details his time having left WWE for TNA. Lockdown is the pay-per-view event where he would face wrestling legend Sting.

As the title suggests the book details the build up to the event with Foley giving a behind the scenes look at how the feud is created, how he comes up with his promos and his fears regarding his injuries and whether he can still deliver an entertaining match.

Foley talks about the mental and physical preparation, the way he tries to build the story for the match. It’s interesting and shows the work and dedication he puts into his craft.

It also provides insight into why Foley left the WWE, and the problems he had there towards the end.

Other parts of the book see Foley write on a variety of subjects including performance enhancing drugs, Tori Amos and his charity work. In places Foley’s humour is slightly juvenile but he still manages to come across well.

For wrestling fans it’s another chance to look behind the curtains and Foley continues to write well.

Verdict: A fun and interesting read about the wrestling business. Foley is adorably goofy at times and a warm, engaging writer. Non wrestling fams might not be too fussed, but for Foley fans it’s a solid read. 7/10.

Any thoughts? You know what to do. BETEO.